AWS and high performance commodity

One of the primary influencers on cloud application architectures is the lack of high performance infrastructure — particularly infrastructure that satisfies the I/O demands of databases. Databases running on public cloud infrastructure have never had access to the custom-build high I/O infrastructure of their on-premise counterparts. This had led to the well known idea that “SQL doesn’t scale” and the rise of distributed databases has been on the back of the performance bottleneck of SQL. Ask any Oracle sales rep and they will tell you that SQL scales very well and will point to an impressive list of references. The truth about SQL scalability is that it should rather be worded as ‘SQL doesn’t scale on commodity infrastructure’. There are enough stories on poor and unreliable performance of EBS backed EC2 instances to lend credibility to that statement.

Given high performance infrastructure, dedicated network backbones, Fusion-IO cards on the bus, silly amounts of RAM, and other tweaks, SQL databases will run very well for most needs. The desire for running databases on commodity hardware comes largely down to cost (with influence of availability). Why run your database on hardware that costs a million dollars, licences that cost about the same and support agreements that cost even more, when you can run it on commodity hardware, with open-source software for a fraction of the cost?

That’s all very fine and well until high performance becomes commodity. When high performance becomes commodity then cloud architectures can, and should, adapt. High performance services such as DynamoDB do change things, but such proprietary APIs won’t be universally accepted. The AWS announcement of the new High I/O EC2 Instance Type, which deals specifically with I/O performance by having 10Gb ethernet and SSD backed storage, makes high(er) performance I/O commodity.

How this impacts cloud application architectures will depend on the markets that use it. AWS talks specifically about the instances being ‘an exceptionally good host for NoSQL databases such as Cassandra and MongoDB’. That may be true, but there are not many applications that need that kind of performance on their distributed NoSQL databases — most run fine (for now) on the existing definition of commodity. I’m more interested to see how this matches up with AWSs enterprise play. When migrating to the cloud, enterprises need good I/O to run their SQL databases (and other legacy software) and these instances at least make it possible to get closer to what is possible in on-premise data centres for commodity prices. That, in turn, makes them ripe for accepting more of the cloud into their architectures.

The immediate architectural significance is small, after all, good cloud architects have assumed that better stuff would become commodity (@swardley’s kittens keep shouting that out), so the idea of being able to do more with less is built in to existing approaches. The medium term market impact will be higher. IaaS competitors will be forced to bring their own high performance I/O plans forward as people start running benchmarks. Existing co-lo hosters are going to see one of their last competitive bastions (offering hand assembled high performance infrastructure) broken and will struggle to differentiate themselves from the competition.

Down with latency! Up with IOPS! Bring on commodity performance!

Simon Munro

@simonmunro

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